Immigration Lawyer Blog

Hypothetical U Visa

U-Visa Hypothetical  HH

 

Hypothetical:

Two individuals, who both entered without inspection, marry.  The couple’s home is broken into two and thieves steal nearly 10,000 dollars in property. The homeowners cooperate with the police and, through their cooperation find the criminals. Are they eligible for a U-visa?

 

U-Visa:

The U Visa is a special non-immigrant visa available to the victims of crimes that occurred in the United States or territories. Aside from the location of the crime, the applicant must demonstrate that they “a) suffered substantial physical or mental anguish as a result of having been a victim of ‘qualifying criminal activity,’ b) possess credible and reliable information establishing that he or she has knowledge of the details concerning the qualifying criminal activity upon which his or her petition is based and  c) has been helpful is being helpful or is likely to be helpful to a certifying agency in the investigation or persecution of the qualifying criminal activity.”1

A qualifying criminal activity is defined as one, a combination of or an activity similar to, one of the following crimes: blackmail, incest, perjury, domestic violence, involuntary servitude, rape, extortion, kidnapping, sexual assault, false imprisonment, manslaughter, sexual exploitation, felonious assault, murder, abusive sexual contact, female genital mutilation, obstruction of justice, slave trade, held as a hostage, peonage, witness tampering or the attempt, conspiracy or solicitation to commit any of these crimes.… Continue reading...

Posted in Immigration Lawyer Blog | Tagged , |

Economic Impacts of Passing the DREAM Act

Since 2001, the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors, or DREAM Act, has been stagnating in Congress. Essentially, this bill would grant conditional permanent residency to eligible immigrants of good moral character, who graduate from U.S. high schools and have lived in the U.S. for 5 continuous years prior to the bill’s enactment, contingent on the requirement that they attend college or join the military.

Rather than examine the DREAM Act from an ideological perspective, this article will explore the economics of the DREAM Act; both the benefits in economic growth, as well as the overall cost of passing this controversial piece of legislation. Using data collected by the Congressional Budget Office, The Center for American Progress, and the North American Integration and Development Center (NAID) at UCLA, this article will highlight the positives and the negative aspects regarding the economic impact of this bill.

Enacting the DREAM Act would have three major positive effects on the economy.… Continue reading...

Posted in Dream Act, Immigration Lawyer Blog | Tagged |

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program Visa

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program Visa

Overview

Since the passage of the Immigration Act of 1990, the creation of the EB-5 Immigrant Investor program has been an accessible pathway to lawful permanent residence in the United States for qualifying investors. Participation in this program allows the USCIS to grant investors conditional two year green cards, and the opportunity to apply for permanent lawful residency at the end of two years. Approximately 10,000 visas are allocated annually to the specific EB-5 category, for the particular purpose of stimulating economic growth and creating domestic jobs. As such, qualified EB-5 applicants must be able to invest $1,000,000 in a new capital enterprise, or $500,000 in a Targeted Employment Area (TEA).  Investors must be able to present a strong business plan that reasonably accounts for the creation of 10 full-time jobs for U.S. workers. The benefits of such a program can be profitable for both the financial state of the investor, as well as the residential status of the investor and their derivative family members (spouses and unmarried children under 21 years of age).… Continue reading...

Posted in EB-5 Investor Green Card, EB5 Investor Program, Immigration Lawyer Blog |

I- 601A Renuncia

I-601A, Solicitud de Perdón Provisional por Presencia Ilegal

Los inmigrantes que desean solicitar una visa de inmigrante o un ajuste de estatus para obtener la residencia permanente legal (también conocido como “tarjeta verde” o “green card”) deben ser admisibles.  Una razón común para ser declarado inadmisible es la presencia ilegal en los Estados Unidos, también conocida como presencia indocumentada.  Esto ocurre cuando un inmigrante entra a los EEUU sin inspección (es decir, cruzó ilegalmente la frontera sin visa) o sobrepasa su visa (es decir, entró legalmente con una visa, pero se quedó en los EEUU después que se le venció).  De acuerdo con la Ley de Inmigración y Nacionalidad, un inmigrante se considera generalmente inadmisible si él o ella:

(I) estaba ilegalmente en los Estados Unidos por un período de más de 180 días pero menos de 1 año, voluntariamente salió de Estados Unidos antes del comienzo de un procedimiento bajo la sección 235 (b)(1) o del artículo 240, y de nuevo busca la admisión en los 3 años siguientes a la fecha de salida de tal inmigrante o expulsión, o

(II) ha estado ilegalmente en los Estados Unidos por un año o más, y que una vez más busca la admisión dentro de los 10 años de la fecha de salida de tal inmigrante o expulsión de los Estados Unidos …

Esto significa que si un inmigrante estaba ilegalmente presente dentro de los EEUU y se fue voluntariamente o involuntariamente al extranjero, él o ella no puede reingresar a los EEUU por un periodo de 3 o 10 años.… Continue reading...

Posted in Immigration Lawyer Blog, Waiver of Admissibility, Waiver of Inadmissibility |

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program Word

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program Visa

Overview

Since the passage of the Immigration Act of 1990, the creation of the EB-5 Immigrant Investor program has been an accessible pathway to lawful permanent residence in the United States for qualifying investors. Participation in this program allows the USCIS to grant investors conditional two year green cards, and the opportunity to apply for permanent lawful residency at the end of two years. Approximately 10,000 visas are allocated annually to the specific EB-5 category, for the particular purpose of stimulating economic growth and creating domestic jobs. As such, qualified EB-5 applicants must be able to invest $1,000,000 in a new capital enterprise, or $500,000 in a Targeted Employment Area (TEA).  Investors must be able to present a strong business plan that reasonably accounts for the creation of 10 full-time jobs for U.S. workers. The benefits of such a program can be profitable for both the financial state of the investor, as well as the residential status of the investor and their derivative family members (spouses and unmarried children under 21 years of age).… Continue reading...

Posted in EB-5 Investor Green Card, EB5 Investor Program, Immigration Lawyer Blog |